happiness

Which is the greenest, happiest country in the world?

Which is the greenest, happiest country in the world?     Is life on this planet getting better? When it comes to the progress of nations, how do you measure what matters most? There’s wealth, there’s health, there’s basic human freedoms. These criteria, and others, make regular appearances in a variety of international rankings, from the Better Life Index to the Sustainable Economic Development Assessment and the World Happiness Report. But a new study takes a different approach. The Happy Planet Index, which has just published its 2016 edition, measures health and happiness not in isolation but against a crucial new gold standard for success: sustainability. The formula goes something like this: take the well-being and longevity of a population, measure how equally both are distributed, then set the result against each country's ecological footprint. Mostrar detalle

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Evolution

DNA clue to how humans evolved big brains by @hbriggs BBC

DNA clue to how humans evolved big brains by @hbriggs BBC     The mutation was also present in our evolutionary "cousins" - the Neanderthals and Denisovans. However, it is not found in humans' closest living relatives, the chimpanzees. As early humans evolved, they developed larger and more complex brains, which can process and store a lot of information. Last year, scientists pinpointed a human gene that they think was behind the expansion of a key brain region known as the neocortex. They believe the gene arose about five or six million years ago, after the human line had split off from chimpanzees. Now, researchers have found a tiny DNA change - a point mutation - that appears to have changed the function of the gene, sparking the process of expansion of the neocortex. Mostrar detalle

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First Job

The unglamorous first jobs of well known successful people

The unglamorous first jobs of well known successful people     It can be easy to see the world's most powerful and influential people as occupying a sphere far removed from the rest us. But even some of the most successful people started off working odd jobs to earn money and learn the ropes. These 25 successful people prove that the path to success doesn't have to be linear. Dylan Love contributed reporting.

  • Donald Trump collected bottles.
  • Hillary Clinton supervised park activities.
  • President Barack Obama scooped ice cream.
  • Marco Rubio built birdcages.
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a research assistant for a law professor.
  • Bernie Sanders worked as a carpenter and documentary filmmaker.
  • Madeline Albright sold bras.
  • Michael Bloomberg was a parking-lot attendant.
  • Mark Cuban sold garbage bags.
  • Marissa Mayer was a grocery-store clerk.
  • Lloyd Blankfein sold snacks at Yankee Stadium.
  • Richard Branson was an amateur bird breeder and arborist.
  • Beth Comstock worked in a Rubbermaid factory.
  • Neil Vogel sold tuxedos in a Philadelphia mall.
  • Robert Herjavec was a debt collector.
  • Kat Cole was a star Hooters employee.
  • John Paul DeJoria built and sold flower boxes.
  • Warren Buffett was a paperboy.
  • Oprah Winfrey worked at a corner grocery store.
  • Michael Dell washed dishes.
  • David Murdock pumped gas.
  • Jacki Zehner sold hot dogs at hockey games.
  • T. Boone Pickens delivered newspapers.
  • Jeff Bezos worked the grill at McDonald's.
  • Chuck Schwab sold walnuts and chickens.
Mostrar detalle

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Parkinson

A brain breakthrough that offers new hope for Parkinson's and depression

A brain breakthrough that offers new hope for Parkinson's and depression     Brains "even relatively simple ones like those in mice" are daunting in their complexity. Neuroscientists and psychologists can observe how brains respond to various kinds of stimuli, and they have even mapped how genes are expressed throughout the brain. But with no way to control when individual neurons and other kinds of brain cells turn on and off, researchers found it very difficult to explain how brains do what they do, at least not in the detail needed to thoroughly understand and eventually cure conditions such as Parkinson's disease and major depression. Scientists tried using electrodes to record neuronal activity, and that works to some extent. But it is a crude and imprecise method because electrodes stimulate every neuron nearby and cannot distinguish among different kinds of brain cells. Mostrar detalle

ID: 299 C: 5 I: 2161 F: 9.710
    

vintage planes

20 incredible vintage planes you can still fly in

20 incredible vintage planes you can still fly in     (CNN)There´s no shortage of cool new planes to get excited about in 2016: the narrow-body Bombardier CS100, the next-generation Airbus A350 XWB and the low-riding Boeing 737 MAX. But there´s nothing like the nostalgic thrill of getting close to some of aviation´s greatest pioneers, from the Bleriot XI that took Louis Bleriot over the English channel in 1909, to the de Havilland Dragon Rapide that carried both General Francisco Franco and Charles de Gaulle on history-changing operations, to the Tupolev Tu-134s that were the workhorses of the Soviet bloc. Surprisingly, many of history´s most iconic models of plane are still airworthy and even available to fly. Mostrar detalle

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SingleBecause the science

Married Vs Single: What Science Says Is Better For Your Health

Married Vs Single: What Science Says Is Better For Your Health     Various studies have attempted to measure whether marriage truly makes people healthier and happier, and how it compares to the lives of bachelors and single ladies out there. Sure, being single may be more fun — and being married may be more comforting and meaningful. But how do these two different paths of life compare when it comes to health risks and benefits? Mostrar detalle

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AUTISM WORK

Neurodiversity: The Benefits of Recruiting Employees with Cognitive Disabilities

Neurodiversity: The Benefits of Recruiting Employees with Cognitive Disabilities     The growing interest in neurodiversity ”hiring people with cognitive disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)” is motivated by companies looking to tap into a largely unnoticed labor pool at a time when many bemoan the lack of skilled workers. Mostrar detalle

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Life

El padre del estudiante pronunció un discurso que nunca Será olvidado por quienes lo escucharon.

El padre del estudiante pronunció un discurso que nunca Será olvidado por quienes lo escucharon.     Después de felicitar y exaltar a la escuela y a todos los que trabajan en ella, este padre dijo: Cuando no hay agentes externos que interfieran con la naturaleza, el orden natural de las cosas alcanza la perfección. Mostrar detalle

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Life

31 de agosto de 2017, 20 años de la muerte de Lady Di

31 de agosto de 2017, 20 años de la muerte de Lady Di     Domingo 31 de agosto de 1997. 12:30 a.m. La noticia dejó sin aliento a todos. La Princesa Diana de Gales y su pareja, Dodi al Fayed, sufrieron un aparatoso accidente a las 12:23 de la madrugada en el túnel Place de l’Alma de París, en la margen derecha del Sena. De los cuatro ocupantes del auto sólo uno sobrevivió: el guardaespaldas Trevor Rees-Jones, que viajaba de copiloto en la parte delantera del Mercedes S280, y el único que llevaba cinturón de seguridad . El carro, en el que también viajaba Henri Paul al volante, se estrelló a 105 kilómetros por hora contra el decimotercer pilar del túnel. Minutos antes era perseguido por una horda de paparazzi. Lady Di es trasladada al hospital, donde fallece a las 4:05 de la madrugada. Mostrar detalle

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Restaurant

Are Virtual Restaurants Dining's Next Hot Trend? by @VChamlee for @Eater

Are Virtual Restaurants Dining's Next Hot Trend? by @VChamlee for @Eater     Ando, Green Tiffin, Sprig: No, these aren’t the newest Noble Houses in Westeros, though their existence is nearly as mysterious as the world of Game of Thrones. These are three of the country’s most popular digital restaurants — restaurants that exist to serve food only via delivery. Increasingly, consumers are turning to delivery for their meals over take-out or dining out. This has been a growing trend for the past few years, but the recent announcement that one such startup, FoodChéri, has raised more than $6,700,000 suggests it’s a global trend, and one that’s worth millions. In fact, there’s probably a lot more lush Silicon Valley-based venture capitalist money headed to the delivery-only sector. FoodChéri bills itself as a company that caters to busy professionals in and near Paris, delivering some 1,000 ready- to-heat meals per day. It’s not a restaurant in the traditional sense; hungry customers can’t, for instance, pay a visit to FoodChéri and grab a table for two. What they can do is place an order for a meal that, like at a restaurant, is prepared by a chef, and have it delivered to their home or office. This puts it in the same vein as delivery-only American startups like Munchery, or the UK-based EatFirst. Mostrar detalle

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