While at Cambridge he taught a course on the foundations of mathematics.

While at Cambridge he taught a course on the foundations of mathematics.

Maxwell Herman Alexander Newman

Newman also wrote an important paper on theoretical computer science, produced a topological counter-example of major significance in collaboration with Henry Whitehead, and wrote an outstanding paper on periodic transformations in abelian topological groups. He only wrote one book Elements of the topology of plane sets of points (1939). Writing in [4], Peter Hilton claims that:- ... this is the only text in general topology which can be wholeheartedly recommended without qualification. It is beautifully written in the limpid style one would expect of one who combined clarity of thought, breadth of view, depth of understanding and mastery of language. Newman saw, and presented, topology as part of the whole of mathematics, not as an isolated discipline: and many must wish he had written more. In 1962 Newman was presented with the De Morgan Medal from the London Mathematical Society. The President of the Society, Mary Cartwright, gave a tribute to Newman's work which is reported in [3]:- His early work on Combinatory Topology has exercised a decisive influence on the development of that subject. At a time when the study of manifolds was based on a number of different combinatory concepts, he established a simple combinatory system of simplicial complexes with an equivalence relation based on elementary moves. ... He has proved two important results about fixed points. The first was an early inroad on Hilbert's Fifth Problem, in which he proved that abelian continuous groups do not have arbitrarily small subgroups, the second was a simplified proof of a difficult fixed point theorem of Cartwright and Littlewood arising in the study of differential equations. ... In 1964 Newman retired from his Manchester chair but he most certainly did not give up mathematics. He taught a course at the University of Warwick and at this time I [EFR] was a research student there and met him and attended lectures he gave. He was an outstanding teacher, clearly giving much attention to the organisation of his material. Retirement was also an opportunity for Newman to relaunch his research career which he did with the vigour of a young academic. He published a highly significant paper in 1966 which proved the Poincaré Conjecture for topological manifolds of dimension greater than 4. Lynn Newman died in 1973, and later in the same year he married Margaret Penrose, the daughter of a professor of physiology, who was the widow of the physician Professor Lionel Sharples Penrose.
Más información  


Google Facebook LinkedIn VK Tumblr StumbleUpon Reddit Pinterest Print

pr-sample23
Habilidad-numeríca

Software para adquirir habilidad numeríca

  
pr-sample23
Lógica

El lenguaje es uno de los elementos determinantes para el progreso del ser humano. Láminas

  
pr-sample23
Educación

Artículos seleccionados sobre educación

  
pr-sample23
Parfums

Chanel N5

  
pr-sample23
PUBLICIDAD

Orlando-tips.com Publicidad en Redes sociales y direcotorio comercial

  

Contactos

Teléfonos: +58 212 578 1145
Fax: +58 212 576 3892


0.427